Irwin Merton Braverman MD

Professor Emeritus of and Senior Research Scientist in Dermatology

Research Interests

Connective tissue disorders; Vasculitis; Microcirculation of human skin; Mycosis fungoides; Aging in human skin; Cutaneous microcirculation


Research Summary

Studies include ultrastructural morphology, three dimensional organization in the skin, functional studies of blood flow measurements with laser Doppler instruments, and physiological studies of nitric oxide synthase and endothelin activity in normal skin and in a variety of skin diseases in which the microcirculation plays an important role. Dr. Braverman has developed a method for mapping the cutaneous microvasculature in human skin in vivo with a laser Doppler computerized system which in turn can be used to examine functionally and morphologically for nitric oxide synthase and endothelin activity. These techniques are currently being used to study psoriasis and scleroderma, two diseases in which the microvasculature plays a significant role.

Extensive Research Description

Studies include ultrastructural morphology, three dimensional organization in the skin, functional studies of blood flow measurements with laser Doppler instruments, and physiological studies of nitric oxide synthase and endothelin activity in normal skin and in a variety of skin diseases in which the microcirculation plays an important role. Dr. Braverman has developed a method for mapping the cutaneous microvasculature in human skin in vivo with a laser Doppler computerized system which in turn can be used to examine functionally and morphologically for nitric oxide synthase and endothelin activity. These techniques are currently being used to study psoriasis and scleroderma, two diseases in which the microvasculature plays a significant role.


Selected Publications

  • Aghassi D, Monoson T, Braverman IM. Quantifying skin sclerosis in scleroderma. J Invest Dermatol 103:568, 1994.
  • Braverman IM, Keh-Yen A. The periadventitial cell of the cutaneous microvasculature known as the veil cell is the dermal dendrocyte. Clin Res 40:496A, l992.
  • Schechner J, Braverman I. Evidence for central modulation of vasomotion in cutaneous arterioles. 17 Clin Res Vol 39, No 2, 1991.
  • Frank AH, Kacinski BM, Schwartz JM, Braverman IM, Heald PW, Hait W, Edelson RL. Sustained complete remission of skin disease is attainable with total skin or local radiotherapy combined with adjuvant photoimmunotherapy or chemotherapy and can be obtained in most patients with advanced (tumor stage) cutaneous T cell lymphoma. (Abstract submitted for presentation to American Radium Society for Spring 1989 meeting).

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