Irvin M Modlin MD, DSc, FRCS (Eng & Ed), FCS (SA)

Research Interests

Pancreatric, gastriccolonic endocrine, biochemical phenomena in the gastrointestinal system


Research Summary

Dr. Irvin M. Modlin is currently studying the basis of gastric cancer development. This involves the generation of low acid states and the quantification of the neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia that is generated. These cells subsequently become tumors and can be transplanted and grown in nude mice. The individual cells can be isolated, purified, and studied, allowing close examination of their histamine secretion. Furthermore, confocal microscopy can be used to visualize the cells so as to delineate their vesicle movement and exocytosis. The cells are also studied through the use of fluorescent dyes, which identify fluxes of intracellular pH and calcium. These studies actually resemble those done in biopsy material from patients. Dr. Modlin's overall research goal is to identify isolated neuroendocrine cell function, evaluate its generation of growth factors and interface this with the development of alterations in cell lineage or proliferation which culminate in the development of carcinoma. The other studies in his laboratory involve the use of isolated membrane preparations from the colon and small bowel; the measurement of motility in isolated segments of small and large bowel; and the evaluation of subcellular zymogen trafficking and exocytosis.

Extensive Research Description

Dr. Irvin M. Modlin is currently studying the basis of gastric cancer development. This involves the generation of low acid states and the quantification of the neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia that is generated. These cells subsequently become tumors and can be transplanted and grown in nude mice. The individual cells can be isolated, purified, and studied, allowing close examination of their histamine secretion. Furthermore, confocal microscopy can be used to visualize the cells so as to delineate their vesicle movement and exocytosis. The cells are also studied through the use of fluorescent dyes, which identify fluxes of intracellular pH and calcium. These studies actually resemble those done in biopsy material from patients. Dr. Modlin's overall research goal is to identify isolated neuroendocrine cell function, evaluate its generation of growth factors and interface this with the development of alterations in cell lineage or proliferation which culminate in the development of carcinoma. The other studies in his laboratory involve the use of isolated membrane preparations from the colon and small bowel; the measurement of motility in isolated segments of small and large bowel; and the evaluation of subcellular zymogen trafficking and exocytosis.


Selected Publications

  • Bryant MG, Polak JM, MODLIN IM, Bloom SR, Albuquerque RH, Pearse AG. Possible dual role for vasoactive intestinal peptide as a gastrointestinal hormone and neurotransmitter substance. Lancet 1976 May; 1(7967):991-993.
  • MODLIN IM,Bloom SR, Mitznegg P. Motilin release in the pig. Gut 1978; 19(5): 399-402.
  • MODLIN IM Mitchell S, Bloom SR. Plasma vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) levels and intestinal ischaemia. Experientia 1978; 34(4): 535-536.
  • MODLIN IM, Mitchell SJ, Bloom SR. Experimental evidence for vasoactive intestinal peptide as the cause of the watery diarrhea syndrome. Gastroenterology 1978; 75(6):1051-1054.
  • Christofides N, MODLIN IM, Sarsin D, Adrian T, Bloom SR. The release of gastrin, PP, VIP, and motilin after an oral water load and atropine in man. Clin Sci Mol Med 1978; 75(6):1051-1054.

Edit Profile