Gerald Friedland MD

Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

Research Interests

HIV care; Injection drug use and HIV; Anti-retroviral agents; Tuberculosis, HIV and TB drug resistant TB; Prevention and treatment in vulnerable populations


Research Summary

Dr. Friedland's major research interests are in the provision of HIV care to vulnerable populations and clinical trials of anti-retroviral agents, including adherence to HIV therapies and pharmacologic interaction studies between methadone and buprenorphine and antiretroviral agents. Dr. Friedland is also involved in studies of HIV and risk reduction among HIV seropositives in clinical care and, most recently, in studies on the integration of care and treatment of tuberculosis and HIV disease in resource limited settings, notably South Africa. His group has uncovered the epidemic of XDR TB in South Africa and is working on epidemiologic, clinical and mycobacteriologic studies in this area.

Extensive Research Description

Gerald Friedland is a professor of medicine, epidemiology and public health at the Yale School of Medicine and the Yale School of Public Health. He is active in the provision of clinical care and in clinical and epidemiologic research of HIV/AIDS. Dr. Friedland's research interests lie at the interface of HIV biology, clinical care and behavior, and he directs large-scale clinical and epidemiologic studies among vulnerable populations with and at risk for HIV. Dr. Friedland also investigates how to integrate HIV and tuberculosis care in resource-limited settings, with a focus on South Africa. He also develops programs to educate health care providers in HIV care and studies transmission of antiretroviral resistance.

Dr. Friedland received his M.D. from New York University School of Medicine. He is the director of the AIDS program at Yale-New Haven Hospital and serves on the World Health Organization HIV/TB working group. He is a former member of the governing council of the International AIDS Society and was editor-in-chief of Journal Watch HIV/AIDS Clinical Care. He also serves as the chairman of the board of directors of the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center and is a trustee of the HIV Research Trust. He is a visiting professor at the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine of the University of KwaZulu-Natal in Durban, South Africa.


Selected Publications

  • Gandhi NR, Shah NS, Andrews JR, Vella V, Moll AP, Scott M, Weissman D, Marra C, Lalloo UG, Friedland GH: HIV Co-infection in Multidrug- and Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Results in High Early Mortality. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2010; 181:80-86.
  • McCance-Katz EF, Moody DE, Prathikanti S, Friedland G, Rainey PM, Rifampin, but not Rifabutin, May Produce Opiate Withdrawal in Buprenorphine-Maintained Patients, Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 2011 Nov 1; 118(2-3):326-34. Epub 2011, May 19
  • Shenoi SV, Brooks RP, Barbour R, Altice FL, Zelterman D, Moll AP, Master I, van der Merwe TL, Friedland GH. (2012) Survival from XDR-TB Is Associated with Modifiable Clinical Characteristics in Rural South Africa. PLoS ONE: Research Article, published 06 Mar 2012 10.1371/journal.pone.0031786 PMC3295798.
  • Shenoi, S, Escombe AR, Friedland G: Transmission of Drug-Susceptible and Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis and the Critical Importance of Airborne Infection Control in the Era of HIV Infection and Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Rollouts Clin Inf Dis, 2010; 50(Suppl 3):S231-237, PMC3029014.
  • Basu S, Friedland G, Andrews J, Shah S, Gandhi N, Moll A, Moodley P, Sturm W, Medlock, Galvani A: The Emergence and Transmission Dynamics of XDR Tuberculosis in Rural KwaZuluNatal, South Africa. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science PNAS, 2009; 106(18):7672-7677s.) PMID 19365076 PMCID 2678614.
  • Abdool Karim SS, Naidoo K, Grobler A, Padayatchi N, Baxter C, Gray A, Gengiah T, Nair G, Bamber Sheila, Singh A,, khan M, Pienaar J, El-Sadr W, Friedland G, Abdool Karim Q, Timing of Initiation of Antiretroviral Drugs during Tuberculosis Therapy, The New England Journal of Medicine 2010; 362:697-706.

Edit Profile