Residency Expectations

Ambulatory Medicine

Developing the skills and expertise necessary for the practice of outpatient medicine is an essential component of residency training in both internal medicine and pediatrics. There is also growing recognition that essential aspects of office practice, such as doctor-patient-family communication, evidence-based decision-making, preventive medicine, and office-based procedures, should be taught to residents in training.

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Didactic Education

The inpatient didactic curriculum in both internal medicine and pediatrics consists of morning report, noon conferences, journal clubs, and weekly grand rounds. The medicine department also sponsors a variety of special conferences such as Firm Conferences and the pediatrics department sponsors a weekly discharge conference that is one of the most popular didactic experiences of the program.

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Inpatient Medicine

A med-peds residency is particularly challenging given the expectation for a resident to function at the same level as her peers in the single-track programs. Mindful of this challenge, we have found that our residents perform well on the wards, as they draw from their experiences on complementary rotations: their PICU experience informs their approach in the MICU. Geriatrics and newborn care often share similar issues of self-care and independence.

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Rotation Schedule

A year-by-year and discipline-by-discipline rotation schedule for residents in training.

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Primary Sites of Training

Ambulatory Training occurs in a variety of sites as described in the Ambulatory Education section of the website.

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Salary & Benefits

Yale-New Haven Hospital offers its residents a comprehensive benefits package. Here are a few benefit highlights.

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