Research

Research in the Yale University Section of General Internal Medicine is focused on selected interrelated areas at the core of General Internal Medicine utilizing the principles and methods of Clinical Epidemiology and Health Services Research.

Faculty in the Section apply these principles and methods to specific content areas including:

  • research methods and policy
  • HIV-related comorbid behaviors and conditions
  • occupational and environmental medicine
  • substance abuse
  • cerebral vascular disease
  • cognitive dysfunction in the elderly
  • cancer in the elderly
  • healthcare utilization and outcomes,
  • medical education
  • international health

This work includes epidemiological studies, randomized clinical trials, case control studies, studies using large databases, and qualitative research.

Faculty have also written several papers in the area of health care policy and have provided national leadership on topics such as ethical considerations in research and international health, the provision of substance abuse services, conflict of interest in research, and the care of underserved populations.

Several faculty are principal investigators and/or co-investigators in peer-reviewed research funded through federal and private agencies. In addition, a number of faculty hold federal or foundation-supported career awards to support their work.

Along with their leadership roles in research activities related to the Yale Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program, Section faculty have major leadership roles in research activities of the Yale Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program, the Yale Investigative Medicine Program and the newly funded Clinical Epidemiology Research Center at the VA Connecticut Healthcare System.

Details of the research activities of the Section can be found at the web sites of the programs listed above and on the web pages of individual faculty.

View the PDF version of the Section of General Internal Medicine Yale University School of Medicine Research Programs and Priorities 2005.