Clinical Skills

This course spans the first eighteen months of school for all medical students. Students begin to develop and refine their clinical skills, the essential elements of “doctoring” that physicians use during patient encounters. In Clinical Skills (CS), students learn to communicate with patients, families, and other members of the care team; examine patients; develop clinical reasoning skills; and understand the important role of a student-doctor in a patient’s care. Multiple teaching modalities are utilized in CS, but the bulk of the experiences are designed to be hands-on, offering students the opportunity to develop clinical skills with direct faculty observation and feedback, frequently with the use of standardized patients. Throughout CS, emphasis is placed on taking a patient-centered approach to care. Students pass the course by attending all class sessions (attendance is mandatory) and performing a competent history and physical exam in a standardized assessment session at UConn. Course content is practiced and supplemented in the Interprofessional Longitudinal Clinical Experience (ILCE).

Jaideep Talwalkar, MD, Director of Clinical Skills Program 

Tracy Yale, MS, Manager of Clinical Skills Program 

Michael Green, Director of Clinical Skills Assessment 

Barry Wu, MD, Director of Clinical Tutor Program 

Auguste Fortin VI, MD, Director of Communication Skills

Matthew Ellman, MD Director of End of Life Skills 

Joseph Donroe, Director of Physical Examination 

Anna Reisman, MD, Director of Standardized Patient Program 

Paul Kirwin, MD, Director of Psychosocial Communication 

Geoffrey Connors, MD, Director of Clinical Reasoning

Rachel Liu, MD, Director of Point of Care Ultrasound

Director of Clinical Skills

JaideepTalwalkar

Jaideep Talwalkar, MD is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and of Pediatrics in the Department of General Medicine, . He also serves as the Director of Clinical Skills at the Yale School of Medicine.

One of the most enjoyable aspects of life at Yale is that students have the opportunity of learning not only the scientific aspects of clinical medicine but also learning about the social and financial factors surrounding urban health care. The opportunity to train as a medical student in this setting is invaluable.