Pre-Medical Requirements

2013-2014 Admissions Season

The minimum requirements for admission to the first-year class enrolling in 2014 are:

  1. Attendance for three academic years, or the equivalent, at an accredited college, university, or institute of technology.
  2. Satisfactory completion of the following courses, including laboratory work:
  • General Biology or Zoology (2 semesters)
  • General Chemistry (2 semesters)
  • Organic Chemistry (2 semesters)
  • General Physics (2 semesters)

2014-15 Admissions Season

Premedical requirements have been under review at Yale School of Medicine, and changes have been made.  Beginning with the 2014-15 admissions season, one semester of biochemistry has been added to Yale's traditional course requirements, and the organic chemistry requirement has been reduced from a full year to one semester.

The minimum requirements for admission to the first-year class enrolling in 2015 are:

  1. Attendance for three academic years, or the equivalent, at an accredited college, university, or institute of technology.
  2. Satisfactory completion of the following courses, including laboratory work:
  • General Biology or Zoology (2 semesters) 
  • General Chemistry (2 semesters) 
  • Organic Chemistry (1 semester)
  • Biochemistry (1 semester) 
  • General Physics (2 semesters)

For both 2014 and 2015 enrollment, acceptable courses in these subjects are usually given three to four semester hours of academic credit per semester.

Pre-medical courses must be completed in a U.S., U.K., or Canadian college or university. U.S. Community College courses are acceptable, provided that the courses include laboratory work and are comparable in content to courses at four-year colleges, universities, or institutes of technology.

U.S. Advanced Placement credits from high school do not themselves satisfy premedical requirements, but advanced college, university courses or institute of technology courses (for which students are made eligible by AP credits) may be substituted for introductory-level courses in each of these subjects.

The Admissions Committee has no preference as to a major field for undergraduate study and leaves this decision to students with the advice that they advance beyond the elementary level in the field of their choice rather than pursue an undirected program. A liberal education is the supporting structure for graduate study, and must encompass understanding of the humanities, arts, and society as well as the scientific foundations of technology and civilization. The student of medicine enters a profession closely allied to the natural sciences and must be prepared to cope with chemistry and biology at a graduate level. Students entering college with a strong background in the sciences, as demonstrated by advanced placement, are encouraged to substitute advanced science courses for the traditional requirements listed above.