Mission

The Yale Early Social Cognition Lab, led by Dr. Chawarska, is a part of the Infant & Toddler Developmental Disabilities Clinic and the Yale Autism Program. Our goal is to decode the complex processes that underlie the typical and atypical development in visual social cognition during early childhood. 

Participate in Research

If you would like to be involved in one of our studies, please contact Evelyn Pomichter or Amy Margolis for more information. 


Latest News

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We are currently accepting applications for the 2014 Yale Pre-Doctoral Fellowship in Developmental and Computational Social Neuroscience.  Highly qualified college graduates with a strong interest in autism research are encouraged to apply.  For more information, please visit the Yale Autism Program's Fellowship site.

Read About our Research

An article in the Yale Newsfeatures our work on eye-tracking in infants. Published February 5, 2013. 


People

Welcome New Lab Members!

June 2013

Many of our research fellows and assistants are moving on to bigger and better things this summer. Judah Koller has accepted a faculty position at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Alexandra Dowd will be pursuing a doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Texas at Austin and Eugenia Gisin will be starting medical school at Penn State. We're also happy to welcome Lilli Flink and Sharlene Lansiquot as Developmental and Computational Social Neuroscience Fellows and Jennifer Foss-Feig as a Postgrad Fellow at the Child Study Center. For more information about our lab’s members and alumni, please see our people page.

July 2012

We're happy to welcome Sophy Kim as a Post-Doctoral Associate and Emily Prince as a research fellow. This follows the recent departure of Grace Chen to pursue a Master's in education at Stanford. We have been thankful to have Grace as part of our group and look forward to collaborating with our new lab members. For more information about our lab’s members, please see our people page.

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Publications & Presentations

IMFAR Posters and Presentations
Dr. Chawarska is travelling to Spain this weekend to present at the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR). Several members of the lab have had posters accepted for the conference and Dr. Chawarska will be presenting her talk, "Decreased Social Attention in 6-Month-Old Infants Later Diagnosed with ASD".

New Publication: Context modulates attention to social scenes in toddlers with autism
Published August 2012

New Publication: Predicting Developmental Status from 12 to 24 Months in Infants at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Preliminary Report
Published 07 April 2012

New Publication: Early Generalized Overgrowth in Boys with Autism
Published 05 Oct 2011

100 Years of Child Study @ Yale: A Celebration
Dr. Chawarska's January 11, 2011 talk, "From cineanalysis to eye-tracking: Studies of infants at risk for developmental disorders," was part of this year's Yale Child Study Center's Centennial Series (http://www.childstudycenter.yale.edu/centennial/index.aspx) celebrating the 100 years of child study at Yale. Dr. Chawarska was one of the experts who spoke at the first event focused on infant mental health and development held in honor of the Child Study Center's founder, Dr. Arnold Gesell.

JSDP 2010 International Workshop on Developmental Psychology
Dr. Chawarska will be the guest speaker at the 2010 International Workshop of the Japanese Society of Developmental Psychology. The workshop will be held from August 20—23 at Ritsumeikan University in Kyoto.

New Publication: Limited Attentional Bias for Faces in Toddlers With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Published 01 Feb 2010

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Participate in Our Studies

Baby Siblings Research Consortium
Dr. Chawarska was recently elected to be on the Executive Committee of the Baby Siblings Research Consortium (BSRC). The BSRC seeks to accelerate our understanding of the earliest behavioral and biomedical markers of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) by bringing together major research groups in the field to investigate infant siblings of children with ASD.

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