UCL Master's of Research

The MRes in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology is a unique two-year program at University College London (UCL), offered in collaboration with Yale, that focuses on developing skills in neuroscience, research, and understanding childhood disorders from multiple perspectives, including cognitive and psychoanalytic approaches. Students spend their first year in London and their second year at the Yale Child Study Center, where they complete a substantive research project with a mentor.

This program developed from the many decades of joint scholarly work and enterprise between the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, a mental health charity closely associated with UCL, and the Yale Child Study Center. The partnership began when Anna Freud collaborated with Dr. Albert Solnit to explore the approach and treatment of children in the legal system.

Candidates for this master’s degree are recruited internationally. UCL seeks students from diverse backgrounds with an interest in interdisciplinary empirical research, and a strong academic background in psychology, cognitive neuroscience, medicine, genetics, computational science, and are open to candidates from other fields with a special interest in the relationship between psychoanalysis and other disciplines. Prospective candidates are advised to check UCL's website for the MRes, for a more detailed description, current entry requirements, and online application.

The Master’s program prepares students to apply for doctoral research (PhD) programs. In addition, due to the program’s focus on developmental psychopathology, it can be a useful precursor to further clinical training.


How to Apply

Apply through University College London's online application system to the Master's in Research (MRes) in Developmental Neuroscience and Psychopathology. The first page of the online system includes guides to applying. 

Candidates are recruited internationally. We seek students from diverse backgrounds with an interest in interdisciplinary empirical research and a strong academic background in psychology, medicine, genetics, cognitive neuroscience, computational science (and related disciplines), but are open to candidates in other fields with a special interest in the relationship between psychoanalysis and other disciplines.