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Peter E Schwartz MD

John Slade Ely Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences; Vice Chair, Gynecology; Section Chief, Gynecologic Oncology

Research Interests

Ovarian Cancer; Uterine; Vaginal; Cervical and vulvar cancer; Screening for ovarian cancer

Current Projects

Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with advanced ovarian cancer

Management strategies for women with uterine papillary serous cancer

Early detection of ovarian cancer

Treatment of the elderly with ovarian and/or uterine cancer

Research Summary

Ovarian cancer is currently the fifth most common cancer in American women and the fourth most common cause of female cancer deaths. A lack of early warning symptoms and a lack of tests highly sensitive for detecting the disease are the major cause for the high death rate. My research is involved with early detection of ovarian cancer by screening a population of women who have at least one first degree relative with ovarian cancer, thereby making them at higher risk than the population at large for the disease.

My research is also involved with identifying tumor markers which may be useful in early detection of ovarian cancer and in monitoring women who have themselves experienced ovarian cancer. We are interested in new and innovative ways of treating patients with ovarian cancer and are enroll women in a prospective trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Finally, we see a large number of women at Yale with an aggressive form of uterine cancer, uterine papillary serous cancer. I have developed new clinical approaches that have been very successful in the treatment of women with early stages of this disease and am collaborating with colleagues in studying the molecular biology of this disease in order to develop new treatment strategies.

Extensive Research Description

Ovarian cancer is currently the fifth most common cancer in American women and the fourth most common cause of female cancer deaths. A lack of early warning symptoms and a lack of tests highly sensitive for detecting the disease are the major cause for the high death rate. My research is involved with early detection of ovarian cancer by screening a population of women who have at least one first degree relative with ovarian cancer, thereby making them at higher risk than the population at large for the disease.

My research is also involved with identifying tumor markers which may be useful in early detection of ovarian cancer and in monitoring women who have themselves experienced ovarian cancer. We are interested in new and innovative ways of treating patients with ovarian cancer and are enroll women in a prospective trial of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Finally, we see a large number of women at Yale with an aggressive form of uterine cancer, uterine papillary serous cancer. I have developed new clinical approaches that have been very successful in the treatment of women with early stages of this disease and am collaborating with colleagues in studying the molecular biology of this disease in order to develop new treatment strategies.


Selected Publications

  • Schwartz PE. Contemporary considerations for neoadjuvant chemotherapy in primary ovarian cancer. Cur Oncol Rep2009; 11: (in press).
  • Schwartz PE. Cytoreductive surgery in the management of ovarian cancer. Oncology 2008; 22: 1025-1033
  • Hou JY, Kelly MG, Yu H,McAlpine JN, Azodi M, Rutherford TJ, Schwartz PE. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy lessens surgical morbidity in advanced ovarian cancer and leads to improved survival in Stage IV disease. Gynecol Oncol 2007; 105: 211-217
  • Kelly MG, O'Malley DM, Hui P, McAlpine J, Yu H, Rutherford TJ, Azodi M, Schwartz PE. Improved survival in surgical stage I patients with uterine papillary serous carcinoma(UPSC) treated with adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. Gynecol Oncolo 2005; 98: 353-359.
  • Zheng W, Schwartz PE. Serous EIC as an early form of uterine papillary serous carcinoma: Recent progress in understanding its pathogenesis and current options regarding pathologic and clinical management. Gynecol Oncolo2005; 96: 579-582

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